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HEALTH BULLETIN BOARD:

Mumps Information

We have a suspected case of mumps in our district.  A high school student was diagnosed yesterday (11/22/15).  Common symptoms of mumps are fever, headache, and swollen glands behind and under the jaw.  Mumps are spread through direct contact with respiratory secretions and saliva (coughing and sneezing) or through fomites (objects or substances that can carry germs).  Persons with mumps are usually contagious from 3 days before symptoms start through 4 days after.  Students who still have symptoms beyond the 4 days, should not return to school until they are symptom-free.  Once exposed, there is no immediate preventative treatment.  Treatment focuses on supporting symptoms (pain relief, fever reducer, fluids, etc.).   The majority of our students have had the recommended 2 dose MMR vaccines.   Health office staff will attempt to call parents of students who have not had 2 vaccines. 

The Iowa Department of Public Health Fact Sheet is attached for your review.  We will stay in contact with our local public health department and will update you as needed.   If your child is experiencing signs and symptoms of mumps, please do not send them to school until they have been cleared by their healthcare professional.   Feel free to email me at kathycampbell@ccaschools.org if you have questions or concerns. 

Sincerely,
Kathy Campbell, RN
CCA School Nurse

Head Lice Information

We routinely have cases of lice in our school community. Lice are small insects or bugs that live on the human body. They

are a grayish-brown in color and smaller than a sesame seed. The eggs of lice are called nits. Nits attach to hair strands. Nits

can remain viable on clothing for about 1 month. Head lice can survive for about a week off of their human host. Lice are

transmitted from person to person with close contact or by sharing personal items. Lice may crawl from host to host, but they

do not hop, jump, or fly. In order to prevent the spread of lice, children should not share clothing, hats, helmets, combs/

brushes, or bedding (please remind your child of this). Various insecticide sprays are marketed to target head lice on inanimate

objects such as helmets, furniture, and flooring, but these are very dangerous to children and are no longer recommended.

The Iowa Department of Public Health suggests that weekly screenings at home provide the opportunity for prompt recognition

and treatment of head lice. I recommend that you screen your child once a week and if you find live lice or nits, follow the

health department’s treatment guidelines. Students should not be excluded from school because of lice.

Feel free to contact Kathy Campbell with questions or concerns regarding this matter. You may reach Kathy by email at

kathycampbell@ccaschools.org

Chicken Pox

We have reported cases of chicken pox in one of our elementary schools (NBE). Chicken pox is a communicable disease that is usually spread from person to person by direct contact with the drainage from the blisters or by droplet or airborne spread of respiratory secretions. It can sometimes be spread indirectly through articles that have been contaminated with drainage from the blisters. There is a vaccine for chicken pox and it is now required for entry into school, but, like all other vaccines, it is not 100% effective at preventing disease.

Chicken pox begins with an itchy, blistery rash and a mild fever. The blisters usually appear in clumps and are often described as a “dew drop on a rose petal” (water blister on a pinkish-red spot). Blisters often first appear in covered, warm areas of the body such as the armpits, groin, and trunk. They quickly spread to other areas of the body, face, scalp, and extremities. The blistery rash continues to erupt for about 2-3 days. Children with chicken pox are usually contagious from about 1-2 days before the onset of the rash until all blisters have crusted over (approximately 5 days after the rash erupts).

Children with chicken pox should be kept out of school until all of the blisters have crusted over and they have been fever-free for at least 24 hours without the aid of fever-reducing medication. If your child experiences symptoms of chicken pox, please contact your family doctor to discuss care. Please contact me if you have questions or concerns.

Hand, Foot and Mouth Information

We have been made aware of cases of Hand, Foot, and Mouth disease in our school community. Blisters or ulcers on the palms of the hands, fingers, soles of the feet, buttocks, and inside of the mouth characterize this viral illness. Other signs and symptoms may include fever, malaise, sore throat, and poor appetite. It is spread from person to person by direct contact with nose and mouth secretions, saliva, fluid from the blisters, or feces of an infected person. Symptoms usually appear 3 to 5 days after exposure and the rash may last 7 to 10 days. The best prevention of Hand, Foot, and Mouth disease is good hand washing, covering the mouth and nose when coughing and/ or sneezing, and washing toys or other surfaces that may have saliva on them. Children with fever and/or who have ulcers in their mouth and are drooling should be excluded from school until those symptoms are gone for 24 hours. If your child experiences signs or symptoms of Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease, please contact your family healthcare provider to discuss care.

Hand Sanitizer vs. Hand-Washing

The following information is from the Iowa Department of Public Health:

“As the winter months approach, IDPH offers a reminder about the importance of hand hygiene in preventing the acquisition and spread of disease. Both alcohol-based hand sanitizers and hand-washing are effective ways of preventing disease, but remember these important facts:

  • Hand sanitizers are not as effective when hands are visibly dirty. Hand washing should be used to physically remove the oil and grime that can harbor bacteria.
  • Hand sanitizers should not replace hand-washing in situations that warrant it, including food preparation, restroom use, and diaper changing.
  • Hand sanitizers are not effective in killing certain pathogens such as Cryptosporidium, norovirus, or Clostridium difficile.

Hand hygiene is one of the best ways to prevent infections in any season,
using hand-washing or hand-sanitizing as appropriate. For more information, visit www.cdc.gov/handwashing/.”

School Dental Screenings
All children newly enrolling in an Iowa elementary or high school are required to have a dental screening. This requirement was passed by the 2007 legislature and became effective July 1, 2008. The purpose of the dental screening requirement is to improve the oral health of Iowa's children. Dental screenings help with early detection and treatment of dental disease; promote the importance of oral health for school readiness and learning; and contribute to statewide surveillance of oral health.
Dental screenings are provided by an integrated network of health care professionals to supplement Iowa's dental workforce. Regional I-Smile™ coordinators, serving at the "hub" of this network, partner with schools to assist students who need a screening or require follow-up dental care.
The following are highlights of the school dental screening requirement:

  • The requirement applies to kindergarten and ninth grade students only.
  • A screening for kindergarten may be performed by a licensed dentist, dental hygienist, nurse, advanced registered nurse practitioner, or physician assistant.
  • A screening for ninth grade may be performed by a licensed dentist or dental hygienist only.
  • Screenings performed by out-of-state providers are allowed.
  • The Iowa Department of Public Health Certificate of Dental Screening is the only acceptable form.
  • A screening for kindergarten is valid from age 3 years to four months after enrollment date.
  • A screening for 9th grade is valid from one year prior to enrollment to four months after enrollment date.
Iowa Department of Public Health


pdfCERTIFICATE OF DENTAL SCREENING

New Tdap Requirement
Effective July 1, all students entering 7th grade and born after September 15, 2000, will need proof of a Tdap vaccine booster after the age of 7. This vaccine protects against tetanus (“lockjaw”), diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Many students have already received the vaccine and just need to provide the school with proof from their healthcare provider. If your child received the vaccine at school last spring, we will have record of that. Johnson County Public Health will be offering the vaccine free of charge to anyone in 7th through 12th grade who has not already had it. If you’d like to take advantage of that opportunity, call 356-6045 for an appointment.;

CCA Illness Policy
IMPORTANT:
Please report your child's illness
Please review the following guidelines about student illnesses:

  • Please notify the school if your child is going to be absent or tardy for any reason.
  • If the absence is due to an illness, please let us know your child’s symptoms (i.e. nausea, vomiting, fever, headache, sore throat, cough,
    rash, body aches, etc.).
  • If your child sees their healthcare provider for the illness, please let us know the outcome of that visit and if your child was diagnosed with a contagious disease. This will help us track illnesses, identify outbreaks, and allow us to notify the health department if a reportable communicable disease is identified.
  • If your child is ill and has a fever (100 or higher), they should not return to school until they are fever-free for 24 consecutive hours without the aid of fever-reducing medications.
  • If your child is vomiting, they should not return until they have not vomited for 24 hours.
  • If your child is being treated for a contagious bacterial infection (i.e strep throat), they should not return to school until 24 hours after antibiotics are started and until they are fever-free for 24 consecutive hours without the aid fever-reducing medications.

The school nurse or office personnel will evaluate students who become ill at school. If it is determined that the child is too sick to remain in school, a parent/guardian will be called and asked to come and pick the child up.

Thanks for your help in adhering to these guidelines that will help keep our school healthy and decrease the risks of spreading contagious diseases. Feel free to call or email CCA school nurse, Kathy Campbell, with questions or concerns.

Asthma Inhalers
During allergy season, beginning of spring and summer sports, and field trips, parents of students with asthma should make sure their child (children) have at least one rescue inhaler at school at all times. Children who can demonstrate that they know how to effectively self-administer the inhaled medication may carry their inhaler with them but the office needs to know that they’re doing this. It’s a good idea to keep a spare inhaler in the school office. Athletes should give their coach an inhaler to carry in the first aid bag. All inhalers should be clearly marked with the student’s name.

pdf Request for Necessary Medication in School should be completed and on file the school office. You can also get a form from your child’s attendance center.

pdf Hidden Asthma Triggers Can Lurk in Homes, Work and Schools
Iowa Department of Health article.BACK TO TOP

BACK TO TOPCommon Diseases & Prevention

E.coli information
pdf E. coli fact sheet from IA Dept. of Health

One of best ways to prevent infection is to practice good hand washing. All surfaces of your hands, fingers, and wrists should be thoroughly washed with soap, water, and friction (rubbing them together)…
...before preparing food or drinks
...before eating
...after using the toilet
...after changing a diaper (have the child wash their hands, also).

If you are caring for someone with diarrhea, wash your hands with soap, water, and friction after cleaning the bathroom, after helping the person use the toilet, and after changing soiled diapers, clothes, and bedding. Be sure to have the ill person wash their hands, too.


Fifth Disease Information
This is a contagious viral illness spread from person to person with direct contact with infected respiratory secretions. Persons with Fifth Disease typically have a “slapped cheek” rash on their face and a pink, lacey rash on their limbs and trunk. Sometimes the rash may itch. Usually people with Fifth Disease are not very ill, but may have a fever, headache, malaise, or cold-like symptoms a few days before the rash occurs. About 50% of adults have had the disease and are immune. Adults who do get Fifth Disease may experience joint pain and/or swelling. Fifth Disease is generally considered a mild illness but may be serious for persons with sickle-cell disease, chronic anemia, and immune deficiencies. Occasionally, serious complications may develop from Fifth Disease during pregnancy. Pregnant women who feel they may have been exposed to the disease should contact their healthcare provider. Persons with Fifth Disease do not have to be excluded from school or work as long as they are fever-free. As with most illnesses, frequent hand washing is the best defense.

Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease Information
We have been made aware of cases of Hand, Foot, and Mouth disease in our school community. This viral illness is characterized by blisters or ulcers on the palms of the hands, fingers, soles of the feet, buttocks, and inside of the mouth. Other signs and symptoms may include fever, malaise, sore throat, and poor appetite. It is spread from person to person by direct contact with nose and mouth secretions, saliva, fluid from the blisters, or feces of an infected person. Symptoms usually appear 3 to 5 days after exposure and the rash may last 7 to 10 days. The best prevention of Hand, Foot, and Mouth disease is good handwashing, covering the mouth and nose when coughing and/or sneezing, and washing toys or other surfaces that may have saliva on them. Children with fever and/or who have ulcers in their mouth and are drooling should be excluded from school until those symptoms are gone for 24 hours.

If your child experiences signs or symptoms of Hand, Foot, and Mouth Disease, please contact your family healthcare provider to discuss care.

 


Head Lice

pdf Head Lice Fact Sheet
We have reported cases of lice in our school community. Lice are small insects or bugs that live on the human body. They are a grayish-brown in color and smaller than a sesame seed. The eggs of lice are called nits. Nits attach to hair strands. Nits can remain viable on clothing for about 1 month. Head lice can survive for about a week off of their human host. Lice are transmitted from person to person with close contact or by sharing personal items. Lice may crawl from host to host, but they do not hop, jump, or fly. In order to prevent the spread of lice, children should not share clothing, hats, combs/brushes, or bedding. Various insecticide sprays are marketed to target head lice on inanimate objects such as helmets, furniture, and flooring, but these are very dangerous to children and are no longer recommended.

The Iowa Department of Public Health suggests that weekly screenings at home provide the opportunity for prompt recognition and treatment of head lice. I recommend that you screen your child once a week and if you find live lice or nits, follow the health department’s treatment guidelines. Students should not be excluded from school because of lice, but please notify us if your child has lice so we can do further screening if necessary.

Please refer to the IDPH Fact Sheet for more information on how to treat lice.

Feel free to contact Kathy Campbell with questions or concerns regarding this matter. You may reach Kathy by calling the school or by email at kcampbell@cca.k12.ia.us.

 


Chicken Pox

Chicken pox is a communicable disease that is usually spread from person to person by direct contact with the drainage from the blisters or by droplet or airborne spread of respiratory secretions. It can sometimes be spread indirectly through articles that have been contaminated with drainage from the blisters. Chicken pox begins with an itchy, blistery rash and a mild fever. The blisters usually appear in clumps and are often described as a “dew drop on a rose petal” (water blister on a pinkish-red spot). Blisters often first appear in covered, warm areas of the body such as the arm pits, groin, and trunk. They quickly spread to other areas of the body, face, scalp, and extremities. The blistery rash continues to erupt for about 2-3 days. Children with chicken pox are usually contagious from about 1-2 days before the onset of the rash until all blisters have crusted over (approximately 5 days after the rash erupts). Children with chicken pox should be kept out of school until all of the blisters have crusted over and they have been fever-free for at least 24 hours.

If your child experiences symptoms of chicken pox, please contact your family doctor to discuss care.

 


Flu Information
(influenza)
The flu is a contagious, viral, respiratory disease.  It is spread from person to person through coughing and sneezing.  Influenza signs and symptoms usually develop rapidly and include fever (usually high), head and body aches, sore throat, fatigue, cough, and a runny and/or stuffy nose.  Some may experience nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea, but that is typically more common in children.  Persons with flu symptoms should stay home from school or work and contact their healthcare provider for further advice and treatment.  

CDC - Influenza (Flu) What Everyone Should Know About Flu and the Flu Vaccine: www.cdc.gov/flu/keyfacts.htm

 


Mono

Mono is a viral disease usually spread from person to person by direct contact with saliva.  Symptoms include fever, sore throat, headache, swollen glands, and fatigue. Severity of symptoms and course of illness can vary greatly from person to person. There is no specific treatment or medication for mono except for treating the symptoms. Students with mono do not need to be excluded from school, but may have limitations on their physical activity and may need more rest than usual.

 


Pertussis

pdf fact sheet

Some people at Clear Creek Amana School have been diagnosed with pertussis (whooping cough) recently. If your child has had close contact, you have will receive a letter from Johnson County Public Health. If you did not receive a letter, you do not need to do anything other than watch your family members for the symptoms described below.

Pertussis is spread through the air when someone who is sick with pertussis coughs. Pertussis begins with a runny nose, sneezing, and cough. The cough slowly gets worse over several weeks, and can develop into uncontrolled coughing spells and in young children a cough with a whooping noise when the child tries to breathe in after the cough. Also, after severe coughing spells, a person of any age may vomit or become blue in the face from lack of air. Between spells, the person often appears to be well. This illness can last weeks to months. In adolescents and adults, pertussis is often a long lasting cough.

If you or a family member develops these symptoms, contact your doctor or healthcare provider.

  1. If your child develops a cough, contact their doctor or healthcare provider.
  2. Anyone diagnosed with pertussis, should take antibiotics, and stay home during the 5 days they take the antibiotics.
  3. If a person has been around someone with pertussis, they need to take antibiotics so that they will not become sick. Contact your doctor or the health department if you have questions about the amount of contact that is considered a risk.
  4. If a person is well, even if they are taking antibiotics to prevent them from getting sick, they do not need to stay home.

If you have questions, call Diana (319-688-5882) or Andy (688-5893) at Johnson County Public Health.

Scabies Information
Scabies is a skin infestation caused by tiny mites that burrow into the top layer of skin and lay eggs. The infestation causes small bumps and blisters and is usually very itchy. Itching is often worse at night. Webbing between the fingers and toes, skin folds on the wrists, elbows, and knees, and areas around the breasts, genitals, buttocks, bellybutton, and shoulder blades are the most commonly affected body areas. Scabies is contagious by direct skin-to-skin contact with an infected person or indirectly by sharing clothing, towels, and bedding of an infected person. Mites normally cannot live more than 48-72 hours off the human body, but adult female mites can live up to a month on the human body. Scabies are treated by a prescriptive cream or lotion. If you suspect you or a family member my have scabies, call your healthcare provider. If someone in your home is being treated for scabies, other household members may also need treatment. Clothing, sheets, and towels should be washed in hot water and dried in a hot drier. Carpet and furniture in each room in the house should be vacuumed and the vacuum cleaner bag should be thrown away afterward. Kathy Campbell, R.N., CCA School Nurse (kathycampbell@ccaschools.org)

 


Tick Bites and Prevention

The CDC recommends the following tick tips to protect your children:

  • Avoid tick-infested areas. Local health departments, parks, and extension offices have information about areas that are infested with ticks.

  • Wear light-colored clothing. This allows you to see ticks crawling on your clothes. Tuck pants into socks so the ticks cannot crawl up pant legs.

  • Use chemical repellent with DEET or permethrin. Spray the repellent on boots, shoes, and clothing. Avoid getting repellent on the hands and in the eyes and mouth.

  • Check your child's body for ticks daily. Be sure to look under their arms, in and around their ears, inside their belly button, on the back of their knees, in and around their hair, between their legs, and around their waist.

  • Check your child’s clothing and family pets for ticks.

  • To safely remove a tick, use fine-tipped tweezers and protect bare hands with a tissue or a glove to avoid contact with tick fluids. Grab the tick close to the skin and pull straight up. Do not twist or turn as you pull. Make sure all parts of the tick are removed. Clean the tick bite area with an antiseptic such as rubbing alcohol and wash your hands with soap and water. Monitor the site for redness, swelling, or other signs of infection and monitor your child for signs and symptoms of illness such as a rash or fever. Take your child to their healthcare provider if these develop.

 


Shingles

Shingles, Varicella zoster, is the virus that causes chicken pox. In some cases, after chicken pox, the virus stays hidden in body cells. Reactivation of that virus results in herpes zoster or shingles. The fluid in the shingles blisters is contagious and can cause chicken pox in someone who has never had chicken pox, but a person cannot get shingles from another person with shingles.

Symptoms of shingles include the eruption of blister-like lesions on one side of the body. The rash is usually painful and may last 10-15 days. Persons with shingles are contagious for approximately 24 hours before the rash occurs and up to 48 hours after breaking out.

If you suspect that your child may have chicken pox or shingles, please consult their healthcare provider.

 


Strep Throat

Common symptoms of strep throat include a scratchy and sore throat, pain or difficulty swallowing, enlarged glands, and fever. Some children complain of a stomachache, vomiting, and/or headache. Occasionally, persons with strep may have a fine rash. Strep is spread person to person by direct or intimate contact with an infected person or indirectly by contaminated articles or food. Symptomatic contacts should be tested. Children with strep should be excluded from school/daycare until 24 hours after starting an antibiotic. Additionally, children with fever whether strep related or not, should not return to school until they are fever-free for 24 consecutive hours.

 


Protecting Your Skin from the Sun

Longer, warmer days mean more time outside and more sun exposure. Even on cool, cloudy days, over 3/4 of the sun’s harmful rays reach earth. This means we can get a sunburn almost any day of the year. Anyone can sunburn and those sunburns increase our risk of skin cancers including melanoma (the deadliest form of skin cancer). Protecting the skin from harmful sun rays as a child and teenager can significantly reduce that risk. The University of Iowa Department of Dermatology offers these tips for sun safety:

  • Use sunscreen with at least 30 SPF every day of the year. Apply to dry skin before going outside. (Avoid using sunscreen on babies 6 months or younger.)
  • Minimize sun exposure between the hours of 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.
  • When outside, wear hats with brims of 4 inches or more.
  • Wear protective sunglasses with UV-blocking filters.
  • Some medications can increase the skin’s sensitivity to harmful sun’s rays – if you are taking medications, check with your doctor or pharmacist to see if you need to take extra precautions.

Tanning beds, booths, and other such devices can also damage our skin – often just as much as the harmful sun’s UV rays. Exposure to the lights of these artificial tanning devices has been linked to an increased risk of developing skin cancers. Tanning sprays and lotions ("tan in a bottle") create a chemical reaction on the surface of the skin and are considered safe to use provided you don’t have an allergy to one of the ingredients.

Protecting our skin now can help protect us from serious skin diseases in the future. Consult your healthcare provider for more information on sunscreens and sun safety.

CCA Student Health Information

Immunizations
State law requires that all children attending school must be fully immunized and have a state Certificate of Immunization on file at school by the first day of attendance. The law has provided for religious and medical exemptions and for certain provisional certifications.

Physical
A physical examination by a licensed health care provider is required when a student enters Clear Creek Amana Community School District for the first time. This includes all kindergarten and new students. A completed, signed form documenting this exam will be kept on file at the student's attendance center.

Health and Emergency Information
Each year, parents will be asked to complete a Health and Emergency Information form for their child. This form will be kept in the nurse's office for quick access to pertinent medical information. The signed form gives consent for emergency medical treatment and non-prescriptive medicine administration should the need arise. Please call your child's attendance center if you need to make changes to the form throughout the school year.

Medications at School
When necessary, medications will be administered at school by trained personnel. The medication should be brought to school by a parent/guardian, if possible, and delivered to the office. If a student must bring their own medication, they should take it immediately to their classroom teacher or to the school office. The following guidelines apply to all medications given at school:

  • The medicine must be in the original container with the entire label intact.
  • The medicine bottle must have the student's name written on it.
  • All medications given must have written authorization from a parent/guardian.
  • Prescription medication must have written authorization from a health care provider.
  • A "Request for Necessary Medication in School" should accompany all medications.
If your child uses an inhaler, please make sure the school has one on hand at all times to use as needed. Make sure the inhaler is accompanied by written authorization from you and your health care provider. In some instances, it is appropriate for students to also keep an inhaler in their possession. Please call the school nurse if you feel this applies to your child.

Screening Programs
Vision screening will be done yearly on students in kindergarten through eighth grade. Hearing screens will be conducted on students in kindergarten, first, second, and fifth grades. New students, special education students due for a three-year evaluation, and students with previous known losses will also be checked. You will be notified if a child does not satisfactorily pass a test. If you do not want your child to participate in the vision and/or hearing screenings, you must notify the school in writing.

Fluoride Mouthrinse Program

Iowa Department of Public Health has notified us that, due to budget cuts, they will no longer be able to provide the school fluoride mouth rinse program. Please talk with your child’s dentist about adding supplemental fluoride to their oral health regimen. The following oral health information is from the Iowa Department of Public Health.

Oral Health for Infants, Children, and Adolescents
Beginning at birth, establish a daily routine for a lifetime of good oral health.

Infants (Birth until 2 years)

  • Prior to tooth eruption, clean the infant’s gums with a damp washcloth at least once a day.
  • As soon as the first tooth appears, brush with a soft infant-sized toothbrush at least once a day - preferably at bedtime.
  • For children younger than 2 years, talk to your health care professional about the use of fluoride toothpaste.
  • Schedule the first dental visit by the child’s first birthday.

Children (Ages 2 to 12 years)

  • Brush teeth with a child-sized toothbrush at least twice a day - preferably after breakfast and before bedtime.
  • Parents must help with brushing until children are at least 7 to 8 years old.
  • Replace toothbrush every 3 to 4 months or when bristles are frayed.
  • Use a pea-sized amount of fluoride toothpaste.
  • Encourage children to spit excess toothpaste into the sink.
  • Daily flossing should begin as soon as teeth touch each other - parents must help floss children’s teeth until they are at least 8 to 9 years old.
  • Continue regular dental visits. A dentist can decide how often visits are needed.
  • Talk to a dentist about the need for sealants and additional fluoride.

Adolescents (Ages 13 years and older)

  • Brush teeth at least twice a day - preferably after breakfast and before bedtime.
  • Replace toothbrush every 3 to 4 months or when bristles are frayed.
  • Use fluoride toothpaste.
  • Floss at least once daily.
  • Continue regular dental visits. A dentist can decide how often visits are needed.
  • Talk to a dentist about the need for additional fluoride.



Contacting the School Nurse
The school nurse travels to all attendance centers throughout the district. If you need to reach her, call your child's attendance center. The nurse will return your call as soon as possible or you can e-mail her at kathycampbell@ccaschools.org.